Central processing unit and Cores

A central processing unit (CPU) is the electronic circuitry within a computer that carries out the instructions of a computer program by performing the basic arithmetic, logical, control and input/output (I/O) operations specified by the instructions. The term has been used in the computer industry at least since the early 1960s.[1] Traditionally, the term “CPU” refers to a processor and its control unit (CU), distinguishing these core elements of a computer from external components such as main memory and peripherals.[2]

The form, design and implementation of CPUs have changed over the course of their history, but their fundamental operation remains almost unchanged. Principal components of a CPU include the arithmetic logic unit (ALU) that performs arithmetic and logic operations, hardware registers that supply operands to the ALU and store the results, and the control unit that fetches instructions from the main memory, and decodes and executes them while relying on the ALU and registers as necessary to perform decomposed operations.

Most modern CPUs are microprocessors, meaning they are contained on a single integrated circuit (IC) chip. An IC that contains a CPU may also contain memory, peripheral devices, and other components of a computer; such devices are variously called microcontrollers or systems on a chip (SoC). Some computers have multi-core processors with two or more CPUs (which are then called “cores”) within a single chip. On the other hand, array processors or vector processors have multiple processors that operate in parallel, with no one unit considered central.

 

An Intel 80486DX2 CPU, as seen from above.

Performance

The performance or speed of a processor depends on, among many other factors, the clock rate (generally given in multiples of hertz) and the instructions per clock (IPC), which together are the factors for the instructions per second (IPS) that the CPU can perform.[13] Many reported IPS values have represented “peak” execution rates on artificial instruction sequences with few branches, whereas realistic workloads consist of a mix of instructions and applications, some of which take longer to execute than others. The performance of the memory hierarchy also greatly affects processor performance, an issue barely considered in MIPS calculations. Because of these problems, various standardized tests, often called “benchmarks” for this purpose—such as SPECint – have been developed to attempt to measure the real effective performance in commonly used applications.

Processing performance of computers is increased by using multi-core processors, which essentially is plugging two or more individual processors (called cores in this sense) into one integrated circuit.[14] Ideally, a dual core processor would be nearly twice as powerful as a single core processor. In practice, the performance gain is far smaller, only about 50%, due to imperfect software algorithms and implementation.[15] Increasing the number of cores in a processor (i.e. dual-core, quad-core, etc.) increases the workload that can be handled. This means that the processor can now handle numerous asynchronous events, interrupts, etc. which can take a toll on the CPU (Central Processing Unit) when overwhelmed. These cores can be thought of as different floors in a processing plant, with each floor handling a different task. Sometimes, these cores will handle the same tasks as cores adjacent to them if a single core is not enough to handle the information.

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